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Review: The Burgess Boys by Elizabeth Strout

The Burgess Boys isn’t my favourite Elizabeth Strout novel by any stretch, but it certainly has its moments, particularly when addressing the onset of late middle age: “So she lay awake at night and at times there was a curious peacefulness to this, the darkness warm as though the deep violet duvet held its colour […]

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Review: The Female Persuasion by Meg Wolitzer

With her usual prescience for the zeitgeist, Meg Wolitzer begins her latest novel with an incident of sexual assault on campus. It’s 2006, and a young and naïve coed named Greer is groped at a frat party. At first she hesitates to act, then decides to take action, spurred on by her hero and mentor, […]

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The Female Persuasion by Meg Wolitzer

With her usual prescience for the zeitgeist, Meg Wolitzer begins her latest novel with an incident of sexual assault on campus.  It’s 2006, and a young and naïve coed named Greer is groped at a frat party.  At first she hesitates to act, then decides to take action, spurred on by her hero and mentor, […]

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Review: The Friend by Sigrid Nunez

I knew the name of the author from a very odd but memorable 2006 novel of female friendship called The Last of Her Kind. From the get go, this new novel, The Friend, felt like a guilty pleasure. Not a real novel but a gossipy and self-conscious collection of observations of contemporary life as a […]

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Review: Go, Went, Gone by Jenny Erpenbeck

In this beautiful novel, translated from the German, Richard is a retired and widowed Classics professor whose narrow existence is forever changed by his encounter with North African refugees stranded in Berlin. The heartrending tales of these men almost overwhelm the reader: Osarobo, who asks permission to play Richard’s piano; the Tuareg man named Apollo […]

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